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Did Commodore have the full rights to the 6502?
Did Commodore have the full rights to the 6502 or did some rights still belong to Motorolla?
MOS designed the 6502. My
MOS designed the 6502. My understanding that the 6501 was a pin for pin replacement for the 6801 Motorola and was just too much of a crossover or the underlying legal battle that Chuck Peddle had had with MOT since he quite, so was remade as a 6502.
According to the Wikipedia
According to the Wikipedia article, Motorolla had 25 patents and Allen Bradley decided not to fight this case but sold his interest in MOS back to Motorola. Mike James took papers that belonged to Motorola and had to give them back. Motorolla was awarded $200,000 and both companies agreed to cross license microprocessor patents. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS_Technology_6502 If they had to return the documents then was this technology really theirs and did they have full production rights?
Since this all happened about
Since this all happened about forty years ago, wouldn't this be considered a moot point at this time?
C-128 w/2Mb REU, & Video RAM upgrade C-64 w/modern PLA Amiga 2000, '030, 24Mb RAM
It didn't become illegal
It didn't become illegal until 1984 when Senator Gary Hart co-sponsored the Semiconductor Chip Protection Act of 1984 which made it illegal to copy chip masks (and layout) to curb chip piracy. So MOS can breathe a sigh of relief because it wasn't illegal. You can find both the Semiconductor Chip Protection Act of 1984 and Senator Gary Hart on Wikipedia.
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