Computers & Linux News

Why Winners Become Cheaters

SlashDot - 2 hours 54 min ago
JoeyRox writes: A new study from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem reveals a paradoxical aspect of human behavior — people who win in competitive situations are more likely to cheat in the future. In one experiment, 86 students were split up into pairs and competed in a game where cheating was impossible. The students were then rearranged into new pairs to play a second game where cheating was possible. The result? Students who won the first game were much more likely to cheat at the second game. Additional experiments indicated that cheating was also more likely if students simply recalled a memory of winning in the past. The experiments further demonstrated that subsequent cheating was more likely in situations where the outcome of previous competitions was determined by merit rather than luck.

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Ford and Bridj team up to bring a new type of mobility to Kansas City - Roadshow

CNET News - 3 hours 35 min ago
Ride KC: Bridj will mark the first public-private partnership between a US transit agency and an automaker.









Iron Boy saves Sydney! And he's only nine years old - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 23:11
After a desperate call for help from police, a nine-year-old boy with Cystic Fibrosis has saved the day in Sydney (with help from Make-A-Wish Australia), dressing up as a pint-sized Iron Man and fighting Ultron's henchmen.









Engineers Devise a Way To Harvest Wind Energy From Trees

SlashDot - Wed, 2016-02-10 21:46
derekmead writes: Harvesting electrical power from vibrations or other mechanical stress is pretty easy. Turns out all it really takes is a bit of crystal or ceramic material and a couple of wires and, there you go, piezoelectricity. As stress is applied to the material, charge accumulates, which can then be shuttled away to do useful work. The classic example is an electric lighter, in which a spring-loaded hammer smacks a crystal, producing a spark. Another example is described in a new paper in the Journal of Sound and Vibration, courtesy of engineers at Ohio State's Laboratory of Sound and Vibration Research. The basic idea behind the energy harvesting platform: exploit the natural internal resonances of trees within tiny artificial forests capable of generating enough voltage to power sensors and structural monitoring systems.

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SCO vs. IBM Battle Over Linux May Finally Be Over

SlashDot - Wed, 2016-02-10 20:35
JG0LD writes with this news from Network World: A breach-of-contract and copyright lawsuit filed nearly 13 years ago by a successor company to business Linux vendor Caldera International against IBM may be drawing to a close at last, after a U.S. District Court judge issued an order in favor of the latter company earlier this week. Here's the decision itself (PDF). Also at The Register.

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'Doors' offers a shared VR experience with others through art (Tomorrow Daily 313 show notes) - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 20:27
We love the idea of this immersive and interactive art exhibit, which was created to remind designers and users that virtual reality doesn't have to be an isolating experience.









Your refusal to join Twitter is taking a toll - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 20:24
Though it's popular with an in crowd of entertainers, politicos and hipsters, the microblogging service is having a hard time getting regular people to join. That's a problem, a big problem.









Hackers are trying to steal our tax refunds -- again - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 20:20
Criminals are increasingly attacking government agencies in hopes of stealing our money and information.









Facebook Developing Radio Wave Mesh To Connect Offline Areas

SlashDot - Wed, 2016-02-10 18:59
An anonymous reader writes: As part of its wider Internet.org initiative to deliver connectivity to poor and rural communities, Facebook is actively developing a new network technology which uses millimetre wave bands to transmit data. Facebook engineer Sanjai Kohli filed two patents which outlined a 'next generation' data system, which would make use of millimetre wave technology deployed as mesh networks. Kohli's patents detailed a type of centralised, cloud-based routing system which 'dynamically adjusts route and frequency channel assignments, transmit power, modulation, coding, and symbol rate to maximize network capacity and probability of packet delivery, rather than trying to maximize the capacity of any one link.'

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Carly Fiorina's status update: Out of White House race - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 18:43
The Republican candidate bids farewell to her presidential aspirations via Facebook.









HBO Now slow to catch on - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 18:32
The premium channel's online-only offering has 800,000 subscribers, failing to meet the huge expectations for the new service.









LibreOffice 5.1 Officially Released

SlashDot - Wed, 2016-02-10 18:22
prisoninmate writes: After being in development for the last three months or so, LibreOffice 5.1 comes today to a desktop environment near you with some of the most attractive features you've ever seen in an open-source office suite software product, no matter the operating system used. The release highlights of LibreOffice 5.1 include a redesigned user interface for improved ease of use, better interoperability with OOXML files, support for reading and writing files on cloud servers, enhanced support for the ODF 1.2 file format, as well as additional Spreadsheet functions and features. Yesterday, even with the previous version, I was able to successfully use a moderately complex docx template without a hitch — the kind of thing that would have been a pipe-dream not too long ago.

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Facebook board member offends India. Facebook recoils - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 18:06
The famed tech investor Marc Andreessen put his foot in his mouth after India rejected a program backed by the social network. Now he's saying sorry.









Your refusal to join Twitter is taking a toll - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:56
Though it's popular with an in crowd of entertainers, politicos and hipsters, the microblogging service is having a hard time getting regular people to join. That's a problem, a big problem.









FAA Eases Drone Restrictions Around Washington, DC

SlashDot - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:41
An anonymous reader writes with a link to Robotics Trends, which reports that: After doubling the radius of the "no-drone zone" from 15 miles to 30 miles outside of Washington, D.C. in 2015, the FAA announced drones can now fly in the "outer ring" of the Special Flight Rules Area. This means drones can operate between a 15- to 30-mile radius outside of the nation's capitol. Drones that fly between the 15- to 30-mile radius still have to operate under specific conditions: drones must weigh less than 55 pounds, be registered and marked, fly under 400 feet, stay in the operator's line of sight, only fly in clear conditions, and avoid other aircraft.

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Lots of free movies and TV shows hit the Web - CNET

CNET News - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:34
A lot of services charge for movies and TV, but why bother paying?









This Group Wants an Emoji Revolution (Starting With the Dumpling)

PCMag News - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:27
The Kickstarter campaign is also a bid to crack the shadowy emoji group known as the Unicode Consortium.

First Steps Towards Network Transparency For Wayland

SlashDot - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:20
munwin99 writes: For the longest time, when bringing up Wayland a recurring question was 'what about network transparency?!' Well, Samsung's Derek Foreman has today published the set of Wayland patches for providing Wayland network transparency by pushing the Wayland protocol over TCP/IP.

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AWS Terms of Service Offer a Break If Zombie Apocalypse Occurs

SlashDot - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:00
v3rgEz writes: Running at over 50 sections and hundreds of subsections, Amazon AWS's terms of service are somewhat exhaustive, but there's one paragraph that might catch your eye. As of yesterday's update, Amazon has added a section that nullifies restrictions on the use of their Lumberyard game platform in the event of a zombie outbreak. Pre-apocalypse, the terms of service prohibit the use of the engine to manage life-or-death situations, but being able to spin up a zombie firefight simulator at a moment's notice might come in handy. You do have to wonder, though: Does Jeff Bezos know something we don't? Lawyers typically don't approve of Easter Eggs in legal documents.

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Dell Packs Xeon and Quadro GPU In 4lb Laptop

SlashDot - Wed, 2016-02-10 16:19
MojoKid writes: To look at the Dell Precision 15 5510, you wouldn't know that it sits in the middle of Dell's workstation lineup. The laptop is thinner and sleeker than you might expect a workstation-class laptop to be and the premium carbon fiber palm rest gives the system a decidedly high-end vibe. Not to mention, like the XPS 15, Dell equipped this machine with its 4K IGZO Infinity Edge display that has almost no bezel on three of its sides. However, the Precision 15 5510 is actually Dell's mid-range mobile workstation that also supports Intel Xeon E3 processors and NVIDIA's Quadro M1000 series GPUs. It's essentially a mobile workstation version of Dell's XPS 15 line but along with an NVMe PCIe Solid State Drive, delivers professional grade performance and the pro app certifications that go with it. Compared to Lenovo's ThinkPad W550 line, the Precision 15 is a more sleek, stylish machine and in testing it packs more punch as well. Lenovo may already have their Skylake Xeon refresh in the works for the ThinkPad W series, however.

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